Skip to main content

Liberians Take to Streets to Demand Return of Lost Millions





Protestors carried petitions to present to embassies of the United States, the EU and the United Nations in Monrovia Monday, shouting "bring back our money."
Containers loaded with Liberian dollar notes worth $104 million (€88 million) printed in Lebanon and Sweden arrived at Liberian ports in November 2017 and August 2018.
Last Tuesday, Liberian Information Minister Nagabe told Voice of America that there were no records of the containers being collected.
On Friday, Finance Minister Samuel Tweh appeared to back suggestions that the money had not been properly declared.
"I am saying there is no missing money. No one is looking for billions of [Liberian] dollars," Tweh told local radio.
5 percent of GDP
The supposed disappearance, worth nearly 5 percent of the impoverished West African country's gross domestic product (GDP), led last week to a travel departure ban on 15 people, including Charles Sirleaf, the son of ex-president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.


Protestors on Monday braved a rainstorm and a heavy police presence to deliver petitions to the foreign diplomatic posts. Numerous premises and schools in Monrovia were shut, reported the Liberian Observer newspaper.
Protestors chanted: "George Weah, act now," with some asserting that the recently elected football star turned president had been behind the apparent theft.
In March, Weah had said he had "inherited a country that is very broke, depleted by political malfeasance."
Liberian Central Bank Governor Nathaniel Patray said Monday the institution was cooperating with investigators after submitting a request to the US government.
Amos Tweh, former youth wing chair of the former ruling Unity Party, told the media outlet Front Page Africa, that Weah's government must account for the loss, put at 16 billion Liberian dollars.
"We cannot go to other countries lobbying for [more] money," said 21-year-old political activist James Zeah.
Weah visiting UN assembly
The Liberian Observer  said Weah, 51, with his entourage, was visiting the UN General Assembly in New York – his first as head of state since being elected by a landslide in December last year.
Weah would meet with US investors and visit the Westpoint Military Academy, the Observer said.
The supposed cash disappearance compounds uncertainty in Liberia, one of the world's poorest countries that endured two civil wars between 1989 and 2003 and Ebola viral outbreaks from 2013 that killed thousands.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Liberian-American Wilmot Collins unseats Mayor Smith - Becomes 1st Black Mayor In Montana

Wilmot Collins will be Helena’s new mayor, unseating incumbent Jim Smith in a close race Tuesday. 
Collins, 54, will be the city's first new mayor in 16 years after running a long campaign based in progressive principles.
“The people of Helena have spoken, and I am honored to be able to serve them,” Collins said as the night drew to a close. “I intend to work with commissioners, work for the people of Helena and find what is best for this city.”Collins also sought to praise Smith for his work over the past decade and a half.
“I commend Mayor Smith. He’s done a great job for the city, and I hope to work with him in the future," Collins said. 
At the La Pa Grill on 6th Avenue in downtown Helena, Collins and other members of the self-described “progressive ticket” watched and waited for the results of the 2017 election.
The feeling was festive as Collins received a call from U.S. Sen. Jon Tester congratulating Collins on his victory. Victory cigars were passed around the room at the …

Open Letter to President George Weah

C Liberia Clearly CEO calls on George Weah to take Arts and Culture seriously.
The Honorable George M. Weah, President of the Republic of Liberia, I write to endorse your "Pro Poor" agenda. I fully

support your call "to ensured Liberians are not spectators in the

Liberian Economy."    In

order to carry out this "Pro Poor" agenda successfully,

and in order to fully empower the young generation, the Liberian Entertainment Industry must be included. 

Arts and Culture has played a critical role in keeping our young citizens gainfully employed.  From the music industry to film industry to the fashion industry, this generation has benefitted from the employment opportunities arts and culture provides. 
To extend the benefits of arts, culture and tourism, the Liberian government must support and rely on arts and culture as a key input for rebuilding our nation. There are several actions this administration should take to strengthen the role that arts and culture p…

Liberia’s Inauguration Day

By Berenice Mulubah and Kru Cherie
Gbana Pekins and big juesWheelbarrow boys and Market girls Brabees and zogosPenpen boys and penpen girls 
Big boy one and big boy two
Mamie pepper and teacher pepperDecembrians and been-tos Not forgetting Dr. Turn around
All the Maco(s) and Paco (s) That Cerees speaking girl and senate juesMen have come and men have gone Our mothers have given birth to kings and queens 
Stand on Snapper Hill and sing it loud in Kolloque songLet all the good things flowClub beer, cane juice and palm wine tooFrom God to manthe palm wine can’t fini seh 
Tell Ma Hawa to bring the chewThe GB, Fufu and dumb boy tooPalmbutter, torbugee, Cassavaleaf can’t fini seh  
You see what God Nah doPapa God has brought us throughFrom many years of heartaches and shameWiping our tears away
Over the years we lost our waySpilling our own blood from pole to poleSwimming in hurts and painFor so many years things remained the same
Now the time has come To soak our feet in the sand of Sun Set beachSo…