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International Criminal Court Fast Facts




Here's a look at the International Criminal Court.
Here's a look at the International Criminal Court, a court comprised of 123 states from around the world.

Facts: Although created by the Rome Statute, a treaty first brought before the United Nations, the ICC operates as an independent entity.


The Court is located in The Hague, Netherlands.


The ICC is the "court of last resort," committed after July 1, 2002. The Court tries four types of crimes: genocide, crimes against humanity, crimes of aggression and war crimes. It is not intended to replace a national justice system.


Currently, 138 states are signatories but only 123 are considered parties to the treaty.

The United States is a signatory to the treaty, but not a party.


Cases are referred to the court by national governments or the United Nations Security Council.
The 18 judges serve nine year terms.


July 17, 1998 - The Rome Statute is adopted by 120 states, informally establishing the permanent International Criminal Court. Seven members of the UN vote against the statute: the United States, China, Iraq, Israel, Libya, Qatar and Yemen.


July 1, 2002 - The Rome Statute enters into force after ratification by 60 countries
.
October 12, 2016 - Burundi votes to withdraw from the ICC, but is still listed as a party.


October 21, 2016 - South Africa notifies the UN it is withdrawing from the ICC, saying parts of the Rome statute conflict with the country's own laws which give heads-of-state, particularly ones they're trying to reach peace and stability with, diplomatic immunity.


October 26, 2016 - Gambia announces it is withdrawing from the court, citing bias against Africans.
November 16, 2016 - Russia says it will withdraw from the ICC under a directive signed by President Vladimir Putin.


October 27, 2017 - Burundi withdraws from the ICC, becoming the first member state to do so.
March 14, 2018 - Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte says in a statement that the country has given notice that it will withdraw from the ICC. The announcement follows the ICC's February 8 statement that it has started an inquiry into Duterte's controversial war on drugs.


Trials:

Thomas Lubanga
January 26, 2009 -
The trial begins for Congolese warlord, Thomas Lubanga, who is accused of "conscripting and enlisting children under the age of 15 years and using them to participate actively in hostilities (child soldiers)."

March 14, 2012 - Thomas Lubanga is convicted of war crimes for using children under the age of 15 as soldiers.
July 10, 2012 - Lubanga is sentenced to 14 years in prison. He is the first person to be convicted and sentenced by the ICC.


Germain Katanga and Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui
November 24, 2009 - The trial begins against former Congolese rebel leaders Germain Katanga and Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui. They are accused of three counts of crimes against humanity and seven counts of war crimes stemming from attacks on the village of Bogoro that occurred between January and March 2003.
November 21, 2012 - The trial against Katanga and Chui is separated into individual cases.
December 18, 2012 -
Former rebel leader Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui is acquitted of charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity.
March 7, 2014 - Germain Katanga is found guilty "as an accessory to one count of a crime against humanity (murder) and counts of war crimes (murder, attacking a civilian population, destruction of property and pillaging)" for the 2003 attack.
May 23, 2014 - Katanga is sentenced to 12 years in prison.
January 18, 2016 -
After an appeal for a sentence reduction, Germain Katanga's ICC jail term officially ends, although he remains in Congolese custody as the DRC investigates additional charges against him.


Jean-Pierre Bemba
November 22, 2010 - The trial begins for former Congolese Vice President Jean-Pierre Bemba, who is accused of three counts of war crimes and two counts of crimes against humanity for failing to keep his forces from raping and killing civilians in Central African Republic in 2002-2003.
March 21, 2016 -
The ICC declares Jean-Pierre Bemba guilty on two counts of crimes against humanity and three counts of war crimes.
June 21, 2016 - Bemba is sentenced to 18 years in prison.
October 19, 2016 - The ICC convicts Bemba and four members of his legal team of interfering with witnesses during his original trial.
Bosco Ntaganda September 2, 2015 - The trial begins for Bosco Ntaganda, who stands accused of 13 counts of war crimes and five crimes against humanity which allegedly took place in 2002-2003 in Ituri, Democratic Republic of Congo.
Laurent Gbagbo and Charles Bl- Goud- January 28, 2016 - The trial begins for former Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo and former Ivorian politician Charles Bl- Goud-. Gbagbo and Bl- Goud- are charged with four counts of crimes against humanity, including murder and rape, for acts allegedly committed in 2010 and 2011.
Ahmad al-Faqi al-Mahdi September 27, 2016 - Islamic militant Ahmad al-Faqi al-Mahdi is sentenced to nine years in prison after pleading guilty to war crimes for destroying religious and historic monuments in the ancient city of Timbuktu, Mali. The trial marks the first time the ICC has tried the destruction of cultural heritage as a war crime.


May, 2012  - Charles Taylor,  guilty on 11 counts of "aiding and abetting" war crimes and crimes against humanity


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